School of Movement Medicine - Mindfulness in Motion
 
Issue: November Newsletter

Winds, Leaves, Change and Trust
By Hanna
The leaves turn. The seasons turn. And in our northern parts, the colours and lights of leaves, fields, forests and mountains win us over once again with their fiery expressions. Even though the inspiration nature offers to us during autumn seems so obvious, as the coloured leaves gradually fall to the ground, I feel I learn from nature each time – from the inspiration of letting go.

It reminds me of one of the Movement Medicine circles during an intensive, as one of us shared how trees don't think about which leaf to let go of when, they just let go… So during these weeks once again, nature has been my teacher, as I discover the various notions of letting go, and how this can bring liberation, freedom, new spaces, and lightness – through the letting go of holding on, the letting go of expectation, of fear, 'self-made' limitations, of thought patterns that hold me back or constrict me, the letting go of force, of control, of held weight, of muscle… as I give myself to and trust in my long, 'seasonal' out-breath.

And as the wind seems nature's breath, which accompanies and supports the processes of letting go in autumn, for me as well it is my breath that assists me in this, and gives a wonderful feeling of trust and relaxation (with the process) when consciously experiencing and giving myself to my out-breath.

I can notice how my shoulders melt and drop with the out-breath, and how a softening through the body kindles this knowing that my weight is totally supported by the ground – even when I let go. A soothing out-breath can hold me safe in the new spaces of its own emptiness, and the new possibilities which might arise from that.

So my breath and nature as my partners give me a sense of trust in a transitioning time for me. Trust, as the tree does, that when I let go, or when I breathe out, the next leaves will come with time, the next breath (until it is my time to go) will fill my body again, naturally, out of the new and 'empty' space breathed out.

Through my conscious breath I experience a sense of guided and safe landing when I let go, instead of falling. And nature is right there in this dialogue, as the autumn winds are a part of the trees shedding their leaves.

May the wind/the breath inspire me to keep daring to exercise the freedom of letting go in a healthy way of transitioning as nature knows. Only when I shed leaves and let go of the old, can spaces for the new emerge out of winter's silence after the winds, out of my heart's prayer, out of my out-breath...

Autumn-time offers a powerful image of our life's cycles, when the silence of death is closer, when leaves fall and die, and leave behind possibilities of new life and new ways, new buts, in time to come – when the out-breath of nature's autumn and winter is followed by a new and fresh in-breath during spring and into the fullness of summer.

Transition, change and movement: on nature's level, on the personal and on the global level, as also appears in some of the articles.

Changes and shifts: in the depths of relationship, in the teaching of Journey of Empowerment, in the Apprenticeship format, in the rows of trustees of the Movement Medicine Sponsorship Fund.

And as always there is variety and colour within this newsletter: from a German article on Resonance, with an english translation below, to a contribution about the making of a medicinal film, and sharings on the Apprenticeship experience.

One article asks how the practice of Movement Medicine could bridge people of different colour and background, while the interview featured here (piece on the MM Sponsorship Fund) and Lucy's article show how the Sponsorship Fund takes steps in that direction – by making MM more accessible, and through finding ways to bridge through dance and through being human (with a body, in movement). These contributions are asking for shedding, for healing, for movement, for new beginnings, for letting go of old stories and ways, and for equal opportunities. For change, with time, and for fresh winds.

If you are looking for ways to get involved, read the articles on the Sponsorship Fund, one by Rob, and one by Lucy.

For contributions to the newsletter, send articles with heading and image to me: hannaspostbox@gmail.com

With warm wishes to the community,
Hanna

Forthcoming School of Movement Medicine Workshops
By Hanna
Though this year is slowly tracing its arch towards the end, there are still numerous Movement Medicine workshops and journeys on offer – for you to play, to dance, to breathe, to explore, to reveal, to be you, and to feel grounded in body and always welcome in the community.

These are the workshops led by Susannah, Ya'Acov or the Faculty teachers. For workshops with other trained MM teachers please go to the Movement Medicine Association website, where you might also find classes closer to your home.

13-15 November: Wisdom of Truth, with Ben Yeger. Berlin, Germany.
Dive into an exploration of separation from others, or from our own truth; reveal and embody more of that truth; and find in that the resources for positive shifts and healthy relationship.
Contact Katrin:
+49-163-3152714; katrin@movement-medicine-frankfurt.de

13-15 November: Beyond Muscle and Bone – Making Death Your Ally in Life, with Ya'Acov. Ljubljana, Slovenia.
A workshop for anyone who is interested in meeting him/herself beyond our tangible form of body. Explore through dance how it feels to be living a finite life, with this body, as this human being, at this time. In doing so, discover your unique relationship with death.
Contact Breda: +386 31 378 737;
perme.breda@gmail.com

17 November: Bringing the Dance Back Home, with Ya'Acov or Susannah. Online.
In this webinar you are able to strengthen and experience your practice at home (or wherever you are), dance a led Movement Medicine session in your own living room, invite friends to join in, and feel connected to the wider Movement Medicine community joining in. Its £35 for 10 webinars, plus the online access to all the past webinars.
Contact Roland: +44 1803 762255;
roland@rwevents.co.uk

21-22 November: Trance-Formations, with Susannah. Paris, France.
With Move! Evening, 20th November in Paris, France.
Discovering the connections with ourselves and between each other in new forms and through dance, we can find a way to be in community in a way that also leaves space for each unique way of expressing and being.
Contact Pierre-Henri:
+ 33 615 325 816; letsmoveinfrance@gmail.com

21-22 November: Passion Unlimited, with Caroline Carey. Cape Town, South Africa.
With a
Medicine Dance open Night, 17th November in Cape Town, South Africa.
An invitation to discover and dance the place where the soul and the ego fall in love.
Contact Chrisna Prins:
chrisna.prins@gmail.com

21-22 November: Wisdom of Conflict, with Ben Yeger. Warsaw, Poland.
With a
Move! Evening, 20th November, Warsaw, Poland.
Bring into movement and physical exploration the relationship between inner and outer conflict, and find new roads enhanced by change as opposed to repetition.
Contact Kasia: kasiabubel@o2.pl

25 November: Move! Evening, with Susannah. Geneva, Switzerland.
Meet Susannah in Geneva, get on your feet, get into your body and dance and experience the fullness of body presence through movement meditation.
Contact Veronique: inmotioneurope@gmail.com

26 November: Move! Evening, with Susannah. Strasbourg, France.
Your chance for a (first) short taste of Movement Medicine, and an invitation to get on your feet, get into your body and dance and experience this fullness of body presence through movement meditation.
Contact Fabienne Hester: asso.vibrance@gmail.com

27-29 November: Circle, Fire and Phoenix, with Caroline Carey. Harare, Zimbabwe.
This workshop explores the intricate relationship between the yin and the yang characteristics inside us humans and in life. Through dance, through embodiment and through other powerful Movement Medicine tools, you will explore your own circle of yin and yang and how that manifests in your life.
Contact Maaianne Knuth: maaianne@gmail.com

27–29 November: Dare to Dream, with Ya'Acov. London, UK.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Alex Hanly: +44 7868 842219; alexhanly@hotmail.com

28-29 November: Ceremony in the City, with Susannah. Basel, Switzerland.
This is an invitation to a dancing vision quest in a city setting, and in a non-religious paradigm. It takes courage and curiosity to dive into the dance of vision, purpose, and the truth of self expression, yet the rewards can appear in the beauty of uniting all of your sources of intelligence, and in the guidance and support present.
Contact Kristin Glenewinkel: +41 78 801 32 10; movementmedicinebasel@gmx.ch

3-5 December: Wisdom of Truth, with Ben Yeger. Israel.
Dive into an exploration of separation from others, or from our own truth; reveal and embody more of that truth; and find in that the resources for positive shifts and healthy relationship.
Contact Soli Sola: michalisraelstam@gmail.com

4-6 December: Magic of Mandorla, with Caroline Carey. Johannesburg, South Africa
Contact Ryan Klette:
+27 825 520 619; ryanklette@gmail.com

4-6 December: Rock my Soul, with Susannah. Salzburg, Austria.
Here you are welcome to dance your wildness and your silence, your physical expression, as well as your spiritual expression. It is a space to dance the language and the beauty and the diversity of your soul.
Contact Andrea: +43 680 23 876 28; yoga@andrearainer.com

11–13 December: Dare to Dream, with Ya'Acov, The Netherlands.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Frank Beyleveld: +31 71 889 3253; info@karuna-events.nl

15 December: Bringing the Dance Back Home, with Susannah or Ya'Acov. Online.
In this webinar you are able to strengthen and experience your practice at home (or wherever you are), dance a led Movement Medicine session in your own living room, invite friends to join in, and feel connected to the wider Movement Medicine community joining in. Its £35 for 10 webinars, plus the online access to all the past webinars.
Contact Roland: +44 1803 762255; 
roland@rwevents.co.uk

18–22 Dec: Returning Home, with Ya’Acov and Susannah. Waldhaus, Switzerland.
Set amidst the stunning mountains of the Swiss Alps, this retreat provides an invitation to return to the roots of yourself, nourish what keeps you connected and awaken the sparks of hope and inspiration for the coming year.
Contact Roland Wilkinson: +44 1803 762255; roland@rwevents.co.uk

Autumn Blaze
By Ya'Acov
It’s one of those moist and misty autumnal Devon days. It’s not yet 4pm and the light of the day is already fading. I’m looking out across the land at the spectacular colours of autumn that, even in this light, shine brightly. I love how the autumn reminds us to let go and share our colours even as we fade.

It’s been a powerful year already, replete with its fair share of gifts and challenges. I notice that, as the space between Susannah and I continues to strengthen and deepen, our workspace follows suit. We have just completed our third Apprenticeship Programme – the last one in the old format. After the final module ended, I took time out to work on the land and then spent some time with dear friends who, before their retirement, offered similar work to us. It is such a blessing to be able to share our experiences with our elders and to digest and harvest the teachings from this third apprenticeship. All I can say is that there is always SO much to learn!

In this last module of the Apprenticeship, the phoenix that stands at the centre of our work showed up in all its states (life–death–rebirth). We witnessed great courage and creativity as we were called collectively to face our shadows and dance with them. Before the module began, Susannah and I both had the strong feeling that we were going to be in for quite a ride. The night before we started, we did a simple ceremony to prepare ourselves. The force we encountered during our ritual provided us with due warning of what was to come: we knew that if so much strength was showing up, it could only be because we were both going to need it. And so it transpired. It seems to us that we are increasingly being called upon to step up again and again in our own practice so that we are able to be with what shows up on the dance floor and in community.

On that note, this is a good moment to publicly offer our hearty congratulations to all 53 apprentices who have completed this stage of their journey. Many are going on to the Professional Training that begins in January, while others are taking their time to digest and see what comes next. We wish them, and indeed all of us, well and offer up our heart-felt prayers that the work we all do lands well in our day-to-day dance, reaping a good harvest.

As the years pass, I find that what I have to offer – and in turn what can be harvested – grows as my day-to-day experience of life deepens. The quantum shifts that continue happening between Susannah and myself as we learn more about the magical story that is Movement Medicine seem to be catalysing new levels of what we would call ‘reality’ in the workshop space. Being real is what it’s about. Finding the appropriate alchemical blend of safety and support to be able to work with the challenges that arise is the art of Movement Medicine practice. How do we heal the places where we feel victimised by life, without identifying ourselves as victims? How do we clean up our relationship with power as we seek our own sense of authority, without either over-identifying with or denying the force of who we are? How do we dedicate this life-force to what really matters most to us? And how do we strengthen our capacity to witness what is happening with truth and love? These are the questions that for us form the ground of our work and most especially of the Apprenticeship journey.

Our new format ‘rolling Apprenticeship’ begins next August, and the choices we have made to re-structure how we offer the deepest parts of our work seem to have landed well with those of you who have been in touch. A strong circle has always played an important role in my life since I began my first apprenticeships in the late 1980s. More than ever, I feel the need to travel alongside people who have the capacity to recognise and celebrate each other’s strengths and kindly offer challenge where it is needed. It is in the mirror of sharing our own experiences and hearing about each other’s that we discover more of who we are.

And so, as the year continues to turn and the leaves continue to fall, I am sending out this prayer that we all find the circles we need to enable us to heal, grow and discover again and again the heart and soul of what makes us who we deeply are.

I will be travelling to Ljubljana (Slovenia), London and Utrecht (Netherlands) before the year turns. I look forward to seeing some of you there.

For the Winter Solstice we will be at Waldhaus in Switzerland for Returning Home. We are nearly full for this workshop and will shortly be starting a waiting list.

All power to you all on your journeys; I hope to meet you out on the road.

Ya’Acov DK, November 2015

 

Forthcoming workshops with Ya’Acov

13–15 Nov: Beyond Muscle and Bone: Making death your ally in life. Ljubljana, Slovenia.
In this powerful and potentially life-changing workshop, you will have the opportunity to invite in Death, the ultimate teacher, to become your ally – a source of guidance, new perspectives and a clear reflection of yourself.
Contact Breda Perme: +386 31 378 737; perme.breda@gmail.com

27–29 Nov: Dare to Dream. London, UK.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Alex Hanly: +44 7868 842219; alexhanly@hotmail.com

11–13 Dec: Dare to Dream. The Netherlands.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Frank Beyleveld: +31 71 889 3253; info@karuna-events.nl

18–22 Dec: Returning Home with Ya’Acov and Susannah. Waldhaus, Switzerland.
Set amidst the stunning mountains of the Swiss Alps, this retreat provides an invitation to return to the roots of yourself, nourish what keeps you connected and awaken the sparks of hope and inspiration for the coming year.
Contact Roland Wilkinson: +44 1803 762255; roland@rwevents.co.uk

5–7 Feb: Dare to Dream. Verona, Italy.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Tamara Candiracci and Silvana Rigabon: +39 3396571488; movement.medicine.italia@gmail.com

10–25 Feb: Dancing with the Heart of the World IV: Amazonian intensive with Ya’Acov, Susannah and David Tucker. Ecuador.
In this radical and powerful intensive, Ya’Acov and Susannah team up with Pachamama Journeys director David Tucker to take participants on a life-changing journey into the rainforest.
For more information, visit: http://www.pachamama.org/journeys/dates/feb-10

27–28 Feb: Dare to Dream. Burlington, Vermont, USA.
Birth your dreams into reality by bringing the yin of deep listening and the yang of courageous action into dynamic balance through the dance.
Contact Carolyn Cooke: +1 802 363 4878; cecookevt@comcast.net

Passing on the Baton of Journey of Empowerment
By Susannah
Here is a huge thank you to the last Journey of Empowerment group who gave me these roses, as it happens one for every ongoing group I have led. (24 years of ongoing groups, with one year off). This is the end of a long and important era in my life. This October, after 24 years of teaching ongoing groups, I taught my last module of the Journey of Empowerment.

The first ongoing group I ever taught was a 5Rhythms women’s group in Sheffield in 1992, organised by Alison Tyas, which I taught with my baby on my hip.

In the early days, Ya’Acov and I taught most of the ongoing groups together, but in the last 10 years or so, it has become one of my specialities. Over the years, the name of the ongoing group has changed: Zero Zone, Fundamentals and then, latterly, the Journey of Empowerment – fondly known as JoE.

At this point, I want to acknowledge all the people who have been part of these ongoing groups, year after year. You have helped me come to know my qualities, challenges and to see my medicine as a teacher. Thank you so very much. Running these ongoing groups has been a very important part of my own journey into developing into the teacher and human being I am today. I wish you all very well and hope that what you experienced in these groups has served you on your life path.

Through leading these groups, I have learnt time and time again that if and when we (human beings) feel safe, loved and accepted as we are, then our creativity can truly flower. Sometimes this can be astonishing, almost miraculous, as we feel free to reveal the treasure that we have held inside for so long. I have witnessed the emergence of creativity, including songs from everyone, not just those with prior artistic or musical skills. Given the right conditions, we can all blossom. Though we will not all turn into star performers, song, dance and ceremony become as natural to us as speaking once we are in a community which confirms that.

My response to being a midwife to such easy, natural births of songs, dance and creativity is a poignant mixture of both celebration and mourning. I celebrate the flourishing of our creative nature as humans; I mourn because so many people never experience these conditions and go through their entire lives without ever ‘singing their own song’, literally or metaphorically.

At the heart of our collective blossoming lies the ‘community without conformity and individuality without separation’ prayer that is so important in Movement Medicine. It has been my pleasure and privilege to help cultivate, witness and support our diversity and our togetherness again and again in these groups and to see the healing that this can bring to individuals and to us as people together.

Now, as the work of co-leading the Apprenticeship, the Professional Training and the Continued Professional Development seminars with Ya’Acov becomes increasingly intensive, I am finally ready to ‘pass on the baton’ of leading the Journey of Empowerment to Caroline Carey, a path-finder and leading member of our Faculty at the School.

Caroline and I have known one another on a soul level since 1998 when we danced to the song ‘What if God was one of us’ in the dramatic surroundings of the old dance studio of KEVICCs school in Totnes. Caroline first trained as a 5Rhythms teacher, teaching for many years in Cork in Eire. Then, when Movement Medicine was born, she became a path-finder (along with Mark Boylan and Christian de Sousa) within our first Apprenticeship. Since then, she has assisted us on numerous intensives, has been teaching Movement Medicine since 2008 and has been a Faculty road-woman for the School for the last few years.

Caroline brings her own exquisite medicine to this role, born of the depths of her own healing journey through dance. Her bone-deep knowledge of the power of the medicine of movement, her intuitive shamanic qualities, combined with her gentleness, authority and the integrity of her commitment to her own ongoing learning mean that I can pass on this baton joyfully to her – a fellow sister on the path.

I sense us running together, offering this work to the world from our hearts, each in our different and unique ways, but alike fuelled by a common sense of service and healing and the pure love of dancing.

The particular offerings that I developed as part of JoE – working with voice and song and with video feedback – will continue to form part of my offering. They will find their place as electives within the new rolling apprenticeship programme.

With my very best wishes to all JoE people past and future, as well as (of course) to all of us!

Susannah

Forthcoming workshops with Susannah:

21-22 November: Trance-Formations, with Susannah. Paris, France.
With Move! Evening, 20th November in Paris, France.
Discovering the connections with ourselves and between each other in new forms and through dance, we can find an live and dance community, which always leaves space for each unique way of expressing and being.
Contact Pierre-Henri:
+ 33 615 325 816; letsmoveinfrance@gmail.com

25 November: Move! Evening, with Susannah. Geneva, Switzerland.
Meet Susannah in Geneva, get on your feet, get into your body and dance and experience this fullness of body presence through movement meditation.
Contact Veronique: inmotioneurope@gmail.com

26 November: Move! Evening, with Susannah. Strasbourg, France.
Your chance for a (first) short taste of Movement Medicine, and an invitation to get on your feet, get into your body and dance and experience this fullness of body presence through movement meditation.
Contact Fabienne Hester: asso.vibrance@gmail.com

28-29 November: Ceremony in the City, with Susannah. Basel, Switzerland.
This is an invitation to a dancing vision quest in a city setting, and in a non-religious paradigm. It takes courage and curiosity to dive into the dance of vision, purpose, and the truth of self expression, yet the rewards can appear in the beauty of uniting all of your sources of intelligence, and in the guidance and support present.
Contact Kristin Glenewinkel: +41 78 801 32 10; movementmedicinebasel@gmx.ch

4-6 December: Rock my Soul, with Susannah. Salzburg, Austria.
Here you are welcome to dance your wildness and your silence, your physical expression, as well as your spiritual expression. It is a space to dance the language and the beauty and the diversity of your soul.

Contact Andrea: +43 680 23 876 28; yoga@andrearainer.com

18–22 Dec: Returning Home, with Ya’Acov and Susannah. Waldhaus, Switzerland.
Set amidst the stunning mountains of the Swiss Alps, this retreat provides an invitation to return to the roots of yourself, nourish what keeps you connected and awaken the sparks of hope and inspiration for the coming year.
Contact Roland Wilkinson: +44 1803 762255; roland@rwevents.co.uk

 

Receiving the Baton of Journey of Empowerment
By Caroline
I first met Susannah in 1998 shortly after I had begun the journey of 5Rhythms in Ireland. I came to the UK to dance at a gathering in KEVICCs school, Totnes. I was a single mum of six children, broke and in need of sustenance. At the gathering, I remember feeling totally in my element; from that moment on, life began to change immeasurably!

Susannah and I connected on the dance floor and had an immediate strong moment of recognition, dancing together, soul meeting soul. Somewhere in my heart and psyche I knew that this would be a friendship and sisterhood for life. 

I subsequently danced in Susannah and Ya’Acov’s workshops and on-going groups for many, many years, growing personally as an assistant, fellow teacher and friend. The support I received from them during all the ups and downs of this time – in both the joys of the dance and the hardships I was enduring in my life – was of exceptional intelligence and compassion throughout.

Over time, my love for the dance developed into a passion for sharing it with others. By the year 2000, I had become a 5Rhythms teacher myself. I had been dancing all my life since early childhood. But this dance, with this community, was what I had been seeking for a very long time. Finally I had come home.

For a while, I had to go through a period of building up my own work and my own individuality as a teacher. Then, in time, I became a path-finder for the School of Movement Medicine; I became a Faculty member; I became who I am today in relation to this beautiful, dancing body of work, with my dancing colleagues and friends and with a strong sense of belonging to what I feel most passionate about.

At a certain point, there came a moment when, looking back, I saw my journey for what it was: one great long ‘Journey of Empowerment’. I realised how much it was the particular work of empowerment that I was ready and wanted to take on. It was now other people’s empowerment that I most wanted to see and support. At the time of this insight, I wrote it down in my journal and I danced for it, not knowing how it might come about.

It was not long after that Susannah and Ya’Acov asked me whether I would teach the school’s Journey of Empowerment ongoing group.  Unsurprisingly, my response came through as a powerful ‘Yes!’

And so it is that I feel deeply honoured to be sharing this work, to be supporting fellow dancers on the path of empowerment. As Susannah passes on this ‘baton’ to me, I receive it graciously and with gratitude for the trust that is bestowed on me. It is not an easy thing to pass on our work, for it is something so very dear to us. So I understand the implications of what it means – both for Susannah and for myself. As time goes on, I know that I will grow with this offering as much, I hope, as the dancers will grow with me on their own journeys.

I am deeply grateful to Ya'Acov and Susannah for the work they have done over many years, and to Susannah for now passing on this baton. It is an honour to receive it.

Together we dance for the good of all, and for the goodness we can feel in our own empowered souls.

Caroline

The Movement Medicine Sponsorship Fund
By Rob Porteous
How do you claim your space to move and dance and be at the centre of your own circle in a context where there is inequality or injustice or violence or discrimination or war?

Read here about the Movement Medicine Sponsoship Fund, with an interview with Ben Yeger and Samar Qudha, working in Israel/Palestine, supported by the fund.

The Movement Medicine Sponsorship Fund exists to enable teachers and practitioners of Movement Medicine to take the medicine into areas where, for economic, social or cultural reasons people would not normally be able to access it.

Currently, the fund is active in supporting people in Israel/Palestine and in South Africa. To give you a flavour of this work, below is an interview I conducted with Ben Yeger and Samar Qudha at the community gathering at Rill in June this year.

The present trustees of the sponsorship fund are Rob Porteous and Jurek Skiba (co-chairs), Martin Arp (treasurer), Kate Lawrence, Petra Bongartz and Harm en Marieke.

And there is also a decision-making group on applications (consisting at the moment of Almut Ibler, Tamara Candiracci and Rob Porteous).

A number of the trustees would like to step down from their roles next year, and for that to happen new people need to take their places. In addition, most of our income comes from the sale of clothing and jewellery at the end of workshops. This is not sufficient to meet the requests for funding that we are receiving.

So we would like to encourage those of you who have ideas about fundraising, or about creating a lively, interactive website (which exists in outline at the moment, www.mm-sf.org), or who would like to be part of the decision-making group on applications to step forward. If you want to make a donation to the fund on a one-off or regular basis, please click on ‘support the fund’ on the website www.mm-sf.org and you will find some options there.

Please read what follows about our work, and consider whether you might be able to offer something to it. You can get in touch with me at robdancingcrow@gmail.com.

I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Interview with Ben and Samar June 2015.

Rob: The first thing I’d like to ask you, Ben, in terms of the peace work you’ve been doing in Israel/Palestine, what is the connection between that and Movement Medicine (MM)? In what ways is MM connected to that work?

Ben: In every way. The general work that I do in Palestine/Israel I would call MM facilitation. It’s the bedrock of everything I do, whether that’s direct action in the West Bank, or working for Combatants for Peace, or running workshops with Israelis and Palestinians, or leading direct movement workshops with Israelis or Palestinians or a mixture. So all of it is MM, and it comes in all those forms and it’s all informed by MM as a practice.

Rob: And for you, Samar?

Samar: I just started doing the work, I haven’t been doing it for a long time. For me it’s more of a vision that’s actually starting to manifest itself. It’s all new to me, bringing it and offering it to other people. I started dancing because I love dancing, I want to dance and connect. So that’s how it started with me. It was just me and my younger sister who met up with Susannah and Ya'Acov while they were still teaching Five Rhythms. We would attend these big workshops with everybody in the room Jewish Israeli. And by then it made me wonder, how can we bring this more to our community, and how much we need it as a community but also as individuals, and in our case as women. Because, culturally it’s very challenging for us to dance and express ourselves and express our bodies, not to mention our gender, of course.

Rob: And how would you see that work developing? How would you like it to develop?

Samar: I think it should develop in two parallel paths. One path would be for me to offer the movement, the medicine, to my community, which is the Palestinian community – whether inside Israel, or in Palestine/the West Bank. Because I feel that as people who are suffering, we need to do the healing ourselves, in our own community, as individuals – to know that this is a tool that can be reached out for, and use it first for my personal growth, first to connect with myself, and then (as second path) to widen the circle, to connect with brothers and sisters. Because you are very limited in your ways of freedom of speech and freedom of movement as a minority. So it’s very important to be able to own that small space, to be able to move and say ‘This is my space.’ It is important to know that I can express myself and I can dance and I can move and I am free to do that, and my community won’t judge me, my country won’t judge me.

I remember spending time with Ben in Bethlehem, which is in Palestine, the occupied territories, and he said simply: “This is your space, nobody can take it away from you.” This little sentence made me think, ‘Uh-uh, are they thinking this is really my space? Nobody can take it away from me? – And in a few minutes or a few hours there could be a siege or something could happen, and even this small room would not be my space and I would not be free to move in there.’

So I just want to emphasise that it’s very important for us to reach out for this medicine and to do the work together, Israelis and Palestinians, in Israel and Palestine. And this should happen in parallel because of the whole issue of superior and inferior, and majority and minority. I think we should meet at a point where the medicine is available in the same measure. Because at this moment I feel (and I believe it’s true) that the medicine and the dance and the freedom of movement and the connection to your body autonomy is very accessible to the Jewish Israeli people, more than to the Palestinians. I feel it should be balanced before we do joint work, for the work actually to mean something. Of course we have already started doing joint work, but for it to bring about the change that we want it to bring, for the medicine to heal the bigger picture and the conflict, the deep conflict, I think we should start in a place where we are equal, at least in our movement. [Applause]

Rob: And both of you, to what extent would you say the Sponsorship Fund has enabled this work to happen?

Ben: I think it’s enabled it to a large degree. I think it’s good to break down the things that have happened over the last 4-5 years.

Three times I’ve been supported by the Sponsorship Fund. What Samar speaks about is a vision and I’m going to talk a bit more about the structure. In the last few years when Susannah and Ya'Acov came to Israel and I had been assisting, we decided to go to the West Bank. Samar wasn’t involved at that point. By all accounts it was the first time that dancing had happened in the West Bank. That was with Combatants for Peace, and it was the start of taking the work beyond the green line. After I qualified as a teacher, Ya'Acov and I ran a last session together in Beit Jala, near Bethlehem, which was a really magical session.

When I started to do the work, I was very clear that I wanted to involve Samar as well. Because, we’re sitting here all friendly, yet we’re 'enemies' really. Her whole family was kicked out from her land because of my ancestors. We need to understand that. It’s not normal what we’re doing here. It’s not usual to talk about working together in this way because her ancestry was affected directly by my ancestry. So when she speaks about space, it’s a big thing. I know you all appreciate that.

We established a relationship with an organisation in Bethlehem that ended up with two dances, one very small one with five people and the next one with 30 young people. It was like walking into any city, but it was wonderful. Young people under the age of 25 coming and dancing.

Just to give a little anecdotal story: There were quite a lot of people standing by the wall, like in a disco, thinking ‘What’s this weird music?’ And Samar came to me and said, ‘What do we do?’ So I said, ‘Just dance.’ So she walked in and did what she does, and she was really worried that they were all going to copy her, but they went, ‘OK, so that’s what we do,’ and they all got up and danced. I put on some music with a bit more beat. We had two hours of really funky dance, and that was beautiful. Since then, we’ve been doing some workshops in Haifa that Samar has organised. The numbers have fluctuated but it’s been beautiful.

The work I do for Combatants for Peace is always joint work with Israelis and Palestinians. We did a workshop in Jericho that had the largest number of Palestinians of any workshop in Israel. But also the work was very specific. The subject was conflict, so it was framed in terms of the subject we were working with. We didn’t talk about the conflict, but we talked about conflict. So the Sponsorship Fund assisted me to go there, to plan this, and assisted me to think about the strategy within which to achieve the vision that Samar was speaking about and how we can do that together.

Rob: And Caroline has been working in South Africa.

Caroline: I think it’s fine just to know that the Sponsorship Fund is supporting young people there.

Rob: The Sponsorship Fund has given money to various projects that Ben has organised, helping people to do work they wouldn’t be able to afford to do if the Sponsorship Fund didn’t exist. And just recently we were able to help someone from a township in South Africa to attend a workshop that Caroline was running. So it has a very specific intention to enable people who come from disadvantaged communities, who would normally not be able to access MM, to come and experience this work.

The punch line of all of this is that the Sponsorship Fund is very much in need of energy from new people who would be willing to contribute something towards it, particularly fundraising, with ideas about where we can raise money, how we can get more donations from people towards this work. The need is to generate more energy. We need to raise about £3,000 a year in order to continue to support people in the way that we have been supporting them, and if there are people who feel they could contribute to that, I would be delighted.

Rob Porteous, October 2015

Moving from Separation to Connection
By Lucy
‘You cannot solve a problem from the same consciousness that created it. You must learn to see the world anew.’ Albert Einstein

These are challenging times. Across the globe, poverty, conflict and environmental destruction are on the rise and the future of our world looks increasingly imperilled. How can we, as individuals and communities, hope to find solutions to these seemingly intractable problems?

There are those who argue that the myriad problems we face as a global community have their roots in a paradigm of separation. And as Einstein’s words make clear, we cannot solve our problems from within this paradigm. So how do we move beyond it?

Founded, as it is, upon a philosophy of interconnectedness, Movement Medicine offers one way that we can support ourselves to claw our way out of the old story and into the new. But if that’s the case, how do we develop Movement Medicine in those areas where it is arguably most needed – areas where conflicts and inequalities are most pronounced and where those who would most benefit from Movement Medicine are least able to access it?

One of the ways that the School has sought to address this issue is through the Movement Medicine Sponsorship Fund. Established as a charity in 2006, the Sponsorship Fund aims to support the development of Movement Medicine in areas of conflict or under-privilege. One of the ways that the Fund seeks to achieve this is by enabling people living in these areas to participate in the Apprenticeship and Professional Training, thus empowering them to bring the work to their local communities. The Fund pays for their food, accommodation and travel costs and the School waives their tuition fees.

At the moment, the Sponsorship Fund is primarily supporting the development of Movement Medicine in South Africa and the Middle East. To gain a flavour of the importance of this work, read Rob Porteous’s interview with Ben Yeger and Samar Qudha, which is also in this newsletter (see 'Movement Medicine Sponsorship Fund'). The interview provides a powerful insight into the ground-breaking work that both are doing to support communities living amidst the Arab/Israeli conflict. However, the problem now is that the Fund is running critically low. There are a number of Apprentices from Africa and the Middle East who are poised to begin their Professional Training but without the support of the Sponsorship Fund this will not be possible for them and they and their communities will lose out.

It is for this reason that we are calling upon you to consider supporting the Sponsorship Fund if you feel moved to do so. You, our beloved community, are our first port of call, as only you can understand the power of spreading this work across the world. Any amount, however small, is welcome. Every penny donated represents an act of love: love for the work; love for our communities; and love for our precious world.

If you wish to make a donation to the fund on a one-off or regular basis, please visit the Sponsorship Fund website, available at: www.mm-sf.org. There you can click on ‘Support the fund’ and ‘Donate’ to make a donation through PayPal.

Race, Whiteness and Movement Medicine
By Lesley
Dear fellow dancers, I'm writing to share something that has been on my mind and heart for some time now. I’ve been afraid to act on it for fear of being offensive or wrong, but Movement Medicine has taught me importance of action when coupled with the heart. It is with that intention I'm writing to you to share some thoughts, observations and ideas related to Movement Medicine and its potential for healing issues related to race and marginalization.

By way of background, I'm a Canadian who has been living in Southern Africa for the past four years. I’m currently based in Cape Town, South Africa. My studies, interests and work are in the realm of sexual health, HIV and gender. Being born as a white woman in Canada, a British Colony and now living in post-apartheid South Africa, I'm constantly exploring and reflecting on issues of race.

I’ve recently been learning a lot through spending time in different spaces, some mostly black radical spaces and others mostly white 'spiritual' spaces. I recently held a circle and invited women from both groups, and it was a challenging space to hold, and despite a lot of good intention on all parts, there was also a lot of misunderstanding that left some ‘racialized’ [For an explanation of how Lesley is using this term please see the Endnote at the bottom of the article] people feeling unseen and unheard. Since then I've been reflecting on how to be both spiritual and political in such spaces. In essence, how to acknowledge source and spirit and the beautiful truths of oneness, love and equality, while also honouring the pain, rage and lived experiences from people who have been racialized and marginalized. What healing and change could come out of such a combined approach?

I have experienced first hand the powerful healing of Movement Medicine and know that the issue of race is close to many of your hearts, which is why I'm writing in hopes of starting a conversation. There are so many big questions I have about marginalization and spirit and I don't have answers. I am reaching out because I imagine that if I am feeling this way then others are as well, and potentially there is work we can do together.

During the most recent MM workshop in Cape Town, Susannah raised the fact that Movement Medicine here seems to be a mostly white space, despite the fact that only 10% of this country is white. I reflect on this often at dance, and especially when ‘racialized’ friends join me in the space (I often have the privilege to hear from them before and after how it feels for them to be in the space).

As you well know, the very issues that marginalize people are the same issues that make it difficult to come to dance, and vice versa. So for example, the location of dance in a previously designated 'white area', far away from areas that were designated as 'black’ and ‘coloured' might make it difficult to get to unless you have a car, and also might be intimidating to some with recent memories of trauma. To hold a dance in a 'black' or 'coloured' area may not be of interest to many ‘white’ dancers because of issues of distance and fear. On top of this, the cost of dance in a system of capitalism where teachers need to make money will inevitably affect racial demographics in a system where class and race are strongly correlated. These are important issues of access to consider in making dance more widely accessible. I also believe that such challenges are symptoms of a bigger system that we should address.

Through learning about the manifold Afrikan 'spiritual modalities', I've been doing a lot of work with my ancestors, some of whom were colonizers and slave traders. This has been both incredibly painful and healing. It has been hard to find a place to love and heal them, despite the ongoing and visible legacy of pain and division that racial separation has caused. I know that healing them is part of healing myself, the generations to come after me and part of a bigger racial healing that is needed in the world.

This is lifelong work and I am still a child in it – I don't have answers or any authority on the topic, but I'm feeling more and more that to heal and shift the racial demographics that privilege some and exclude others (including from dance spaces), that there is a call to work with ‘white’ people on this healing.

My sense is that sometimes it is so difficult and painful to look at the atrocities of the past, including how we, or our ancestors, were involved or benefited, that we shut down. I have sensed this happening in spiritual spaces with mostly privileged (including ‘white’ and middle-class) participants, where we focus on oneness and healing the world, without addressing the fragmented nature of the spaces themselves, which often times don’t include our ‘racialized’ and/or lower class brothers and sisters.

I don't know the solution, but in studying anti-oppression, reading Steve Biko's texts on white liberalism and through exploring being conditioned into both oppressed and oppressor roles through being both 'white', and a woman, I'm feeling the need to work with other ‘white’ people on issues of race and privilege. Biko posits that for white liberals, part of our work is within white society, which I think dance provides a huge opportunity for. He puts forth that the 'white liberal' should 'serve as a lubricating material so that as we change gears in trying to find a better direction for South Africa, there should be no grinding noises of metal against metal but a free and easy flowing movement which will be characteristic of a well-looked-after vehicle' (Steve Biko, excerpt from ‘I write what I like: Black souls in white skins').

During a ceremony in the ‘Alchemy of Stillness’ workshop in Cape Town, I did some race work with my ancestors, bridging the continents they came from and facilitating scary and important conversations.

I wonder if, alongside the diversity work to make Movement Medicine more accessible to people of all racial backgrounds, we could also work with 'white' conscious dancers around these issues? I imagine that this would go beyond healing us and help us move towards a space where we can break down old power and racial barriers and create a more open, inviting and creative community, and a more equal platform for people of all races to feel comfortable to come into the space. This came to me after countless conversations with ‘racialized’ and ‘white’ dance friends and many hours pondering and working through how to create a more inclusive space.

I've been wanting to start working with groups of ‘white’ people in spiritual spaces, but have been feeling hesitant to start. I have some of the skills necessary to facilitate conversations on race and whiteness – the kind of work that is done in intellectual and political spaces. The problem is that I'm feeling these spaces to be lacking an embodied approach.

I think that through combining this type of work with dance and other conscious modalities, we could accomplish incredible things with transformation and healing. I would love to create such a space but I don't have the tools to facilitate it in an embodied way. I think that Movement Medicine could create such a platform for this work.

I am writing in the knowledge that issues of race and privilege in dance spaces are close to many of our hearts. I am calling out to fellow dancers, truth seekers and healers for ideas, guidance and solidarity as to how we can collaborate together on this. My email address is lesley.gittings@gmail.com and I encourage you to get in touch.

If you made it to the bottom, thanks for reading this long letter. I hope that I have not been too forward in sending it. I would be amiss to say that I don’t fear the backlash that often comes from speaking out about issues of dismantling power. However, one thing I learned from dance is the importance of action and showing up for what is in our hearts and the work that we believe in. It is with that energy and loving intention I write to you my fellow dancers.

With best wishes, deep gratitude, solidarity, hope and love,

Lesley

 

Endnotes

The term ‘racialization is described as follows in the Association of Ontario Health Centres’ anti-oppression policy: ‘While biological notions of race have been discredited, the social construction of race remains a potent force in society. The process of social construction of race is termed “racialization.”… “Racialization” [has been defined] as the process by which societies construct races as real, different and unequal in ways that matter to economic, political and social life.” (Commission on Systemic Racism in the Ontario Criminal Justice System 1995)

‘When it is necessary to describe people collectively, the term “racialized person” or “racialized group” is preferred over "racial minority", “visible minority", "person of colour" or “non-White” as it expresses race as a social construct rather than as a description based on perceived biological traits.’ (Ontario Human Rights Commission, cited in Association of Ontario Health Centres 2015).

References

Commission on Systemic Racism in the Ontario Criminal Justice System (1995). Report of the Commission on System Racism in the Ontario Criminal Justice System. Queen’s Printer for Ontario: Toronto, Canada. Available at: https://archive.org/details/reportracismont00comm (accessed on 9 November 2015).

Association of Ontario Health Centres (2015). ‘Anti-oppression’. Available at: http://www.aohc.org/anti-oppression (accessed on 9 November 2015).


Making Movement Medicine and Medicinal Film Travel Hand in Hand
By Ben Cole
I am a film-maker as well as a dancer. My new wife is Caroline Carey, who is a Faculty teacher for the School of Movement Medicine. After getting married in July we faced a long period of time apart as she travelled across Europe and Africa teaching MM. So we came up with the idea of making a medicinal film together around Caroline’s teaching. This is her first adventure into documentary and I am impressed at her skills as a documentary interviewer.

So far, at the end of these intense weekends, we are getting a few opportunities to gather stories for the film, called ‘Creatively Addicted’, by asking those at the workshops if they would like to be interviewed.

I am personally interested in how conscious dance processing affects an interview, especially an interview that focuses on such a sensitive and controversial subject as addiction. My concern was that no one would want to talk about their condition, as we can all judge addiction so harshly.

I feel real delight discovering that every one on these workshops is so relaxed and amazingly clear about their life stories.

I used to struggle to encourage those I interviewed to feel relaxed in front of my camera, to be honest with relaxed integrity. I found every one of the dancers gave us the most amazing, relaxed, authentic and inspiring stories. This invites us who are listening to feel very humble and compassionate and unable to judge in a negative way their actions, obsessions and attempts at medicating life’s hardships.

I observed that dancing Movement Medicine seems to relax the body into a calm place that holds the mind like moss held on the forest earth. The practice gives each conscious dancing person the freedom to process thoughts easily like air blowing the autumn leaves; their feelings seem to flicker freely like a candle dancing to friends' laughter around a dinner table. Those conflicts that we all get addicted to medicating are so delightfully communicated, like water off the tongue, standing wide-mouthed in awe, as we watch the rainbow rise over a natural water fall. You can hear that after many workshops my relationship with the elements has improved!

On our journey, we are building such an amazing library of people who have climbed out of deep and shallow holes of addiction to share their wisdom with the world.

We would like to thank so earnestly all who have and will step forward to talk to our camera. One observation to give you all: many have said that sitting in front of our camera and sharing an honest story has felt deeply healing in many ways. We feel that this points to a film that will offer healing to many - healing of the fear of being judged when talking openly about the common things we are all addicted to.

We hope that this film will show that when we talk with relaxed integrity about what poisons us, we enable others to see their own addictions in a new light. We hope the film will offer the gift of showing people that they are not alone in their journey to find the natural medicine inside as an alternative to those addictions outside that do not always do us good. Maybe we will discover that the best medicine is to dance elementally towards health and happiness?

I am writing this in Prague on October 12. From here we go onwards to Berlin, then off towards Africa and beyond. See you on that dance floor of life and if you should be tempted to share your story, get in touch with us and we will give you the gift of using the camera as a special healing tool to add to your Mesa practice.

Yours in awe of this practice,

Ben Cole
(Helping melt the ice of addictive feelings on your screen)

Why Apprenticeship Programme?
By Tamara
If someone would ask me what the Apprenticeship Programme is about and why is it important, I would probably be in a position where I’d like to say in response to both questions: everything and nothing at all.

To cover the nothing part first: AP is such a personal journey that right now I feel no matter what I say or try to explain, it brings out exactly what we need to meet. To be more concrete, the AP is a place, a time and space that goes beyond the modules, and it most definitely goes beyond the year and a half that it lasts.

It is the spark you feel when you first hear about it; it is the application form you write, the intentions you set, the contract you sign. It is the commitment you make once you’re in, the chaos you might feel when organising your life between modules, the waiting on the airport, meeting everyone there, dancing and taking it home.

It is talking to your friends, doing your job, living your everyday life and meeting new challenges with each day that follows. It is a commitment that not only changes your everyday experience, but reaches far backwards where parts of you have been frozen, and gives you a chance to meet these parts, reclaim them and bring them home.

At this point I bear in mind, heart, body and spirit that this also gives you or any one of us with this commitment a true choice for what is there ahead of us, waiting.

It also gives us a chance to discover our own unique purpose, or it gives us the tools to go and look for it on our own. It is only us, each and every one individually that make the Apprenticeship Programme what it is – it is what you choose it to be (what I choose it to be), what you choose to see, to feel, to take with you. It is the dedication you find to integrate it into your everyday life, and your own curiosity for the parts of you that are just waiting to be dusted and polished, ready to shine. It is up to you whether you will choose it or not.

So, AP in my own experience has a big and deep purpose – to show direction, to give tools, love and security to find our own meaning, our own steps and our own dance.

And dance – why dance? For me, dancing is the most honest practice I know. It’s only me and my body, my own movement, the floor and a vast space around me.

Sometimes there is music and other times there is silence. But, I am the only one who knows if the dance I’m dancing is real – how it moves inside me, how my heart feels and what is the expression that wants to emerge. There can be many dancers around me, there can be teachers that guide me, but it is only me, my own love and discipline that make the difference in my own dance. And just like in any other part of my life: the more I give myself to the dance, the more I receive.

I’d like to go back to the first part of the answer – everything. Although I am a month (module) away from finishing the AP, I can tell that it makes a huge difference. Personally, it took me down for a ride through my biggest blank spots and gave me the chance to learn how to truly love both the spots and parts hidden underneath. It took me for a ride to find the beauty, fragility and tenderness of my entire being – the parts that were ready to be discovered. It took me for a ride to see my strengths from another angle, to dance my soul out over and over again and find out what else can I be.

It took me on a journey where at its near end I am exactly the same I was before, but at the same time very different. I feel rooted more deeply in myself without some of the overcoats that I no longer need and with clarity, passion and love for the ‘I’ that I am right now and the ‘I’ that I would like to become. And the gap standing between those two ‘I's’ (or gluing them together as I now realise) is only Time – Time and some good life dancing.

Surely, I cannot answer for anyone other than myself why this matters so much. The only thing I can be sure of is that I got exactly what I asked for, not always in the way I would prefer nor understand, but every one of my intentions for this AP have come to life and given me an intense year and a half of self-discovery, deep new friendships, learning, teaching, laughing, dancing and loving.

And to answer the question why do it – my answer is why not? It’s not like there’s somebody else’s life you need to show up for.

Resonance
By Thomas
Seit etwa 30 Jahren arbeite ich als Musiker und Lehrer für Schlagzeug und Percussion, spiele Konzerte, leite Workshops, produziere CDs usw. Mich inspiriert das Zusammenwirken von Musik mit anderen künstlerischen Ausdrucksformen wie Tanz, Theater oder Kunst.

Hinzu kommt, dass ich seit 2002 Lehrling auf einem indianisch/ schamanischen Medizinweg bin. Das spielen mit Rhythmus und Klang ist Teil meiner spirituellen Praxis.

Hierbei begleitet mich immer wieder die Suche – wie entsteht Resonanz in mir, mit anderen und dem Leben als solches? Wie bekommen wir Zugang zu unserer künstlerischen Originalität – zu einem natürlichen, kreativen Selbstausdruck, der tief in unserem inneren verborgen ist?

Nach meiner Erfahrung sind all diese Aspekte, eine wesentliche Qualität in den 'Resonance' Workshops und geben dieser Kursreihe ihren ganz eigenen und besonderen Klang. Susannah kreiert in diesen Kursen auf eine sehr tiefgründig, nüchterne und sensible Art und Weise eine Atmosphäre, die frei von Wertung ist. Hinzu gesellt sich ihr britischer Humor.

So entsteht getragen von Achtung und Respekt, ein offener und inspirierender Raum, der jeden und jede einlädt, neue Aspekte innerhalb der eigenen kreativen Ursprünglichkeit zu entdecken.

Teil dieser Forschungsreise zu sein und diese mit meinem Spiel zu unterstützen, zu erleben, wie jede/r einzelne zu leuchten beginnt, und sein Scheinen ins Ganze bringt, ist berührend und ein Geschenk für mich, denn es entsteht ein kollektives Feld von Wahrnehmung, Freude und Kreativität, die Ausdruck von Lebendigkeit und der Verbindung zu Spirit ist.

Die Zusammenarbeit mit Susannah ist wunderbar, und so freue ich mich auf 'Resonance' mit ihr, mit uns und euch.

Thomas Ritthoff 'Walking with Sound' (medicine name)

Resonance
By Thomas
For the last 30 years I have been working as a musician and have been teaching drums and percussion, I also play concerts, conduct workshops, produce CD's etc. I am inspired by the interplay between music and other creative expressions such as dance, theatre or art.

Since 2002 I am also an apprentice of Native-American/ Shamanic medicine. The playing with rhythm and sound is part of my spiritual practice.

Here, I am accompanied time and again by this search: How does resonance arise – within myself, with others and with life itself? How do we access our true creative self? How do we find access to our most natural, artistic expression of self, harboured deep in our centre?

In my experience, it is all these aspects that bring an essential quality to 'Resonance', and which give these workshops its particular and unique sound or expression. With her profound, down-to-earth and sensitive manner, Susannah creates a space free of judgement, and brings her British humour along as well.

And then, supported by honour and respect, there emerges an open and inspiring space, which invites everyone to discover new aspects within his/ her own creative and most natural and original way of being.

To be part of this expedition, to accompany with my music, and to witness how each one starts shining while bringing his/ her own glow to the whole space, is touching, and is a gift to me -- for there arises a collective field of sense, joy and creativity, which is the expression of life and the connection to spirit.

Collaborating with Susannah is wonderful, and I am looking forward to 'Resonance' with her, with us, with you.

Thomas Ritthoff ('walking with sound' medicine name)

The views expressed here do not necessarily represent the views of the School of Movement Medicine. Roland Wilkinson, Nappers Crossing, Staverton, Devon TQ9 6PD, UK Tel & Fax +44 (0)1803 762255 http://www. schoolofmovementmedicine.com