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NGCCG - Stakeholder Bulletin
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Introduction

This bulletin aims to give you an update of some of the bits of work the CCG are involved in as we try to transform lives together. 

As ever, we are keen to get anyones involvement in our work. There are many ways to get involved, and these are detailed on our website at:

http://www.newcastlegatesheadccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/

Here is an update on some of our key work programme areas:


 
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Mental health and learning disabilities
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Our current priorities include redeveloping mental health services through the Deciding Together consultation.


Since July 2014, NHS Newcastle Gateshead Clinical Commissioning Group has worked with the public, service users, carers, NHS and social care professionals, the voluntary and community sector, elected members and MPs to consider how a new vision for specialist mental health services in Newcastle and Gateshead can be developed.

The listening exercise was called “Deciding Together: Developing a new vision for mental health services – listening to and collecting your views on specialist mental health services and care.”

People’s experiences are being used to consider how the quality of mental health care and treatment for local people can be significantly improved and how things might be done differently in the future.

The information we gathered is helping us to better understand the needs of local people, and what changes would improve access, treatment and help people get better, sooner.

We will work with the Mental Health Programme Board to consider the feedback, along with other important information, to develop potential scenarios for change. Any possible changes would be subject to a formal public consultation, starting on 14 October 2015.

A full copy of the feedback report and other key documents can be found at:

www.newcastlegatesheadccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/deciding-together-2/key-documents/

 
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Children, young people and families
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We are focusing on early intervention of healthcare specialists, as well as prioritising the emotional wellbeing and mental health of this patient group. We are working closely with our local authorities to work out how we can best join services up and improve them.


Expanding Minds, Improving Lives: Motivating and Working Together to Transform Children and Young People’s Mental Health (Event for school staff)

Expanding Minds, Improving Lives is a project being led by the health and social care commissioners of mental health services.

Along with Newcastle City Council and Gateshead Council, we are working together to transform the way the mental health needs of children and young people are supported and potentially arranged across Newcastle and Gateshead.

School staff have a wealth of experience and knowledge of the types of issues facing young people, and what works to address them. 

We very much value this expertise and want to harness your knowledge at a very early stage of our thinking about the potential design of future mental health services.

It’s for that reason we have arranged two workshops specifically designed for school staff who would like to express their views and help us shape better, more responsive mental health services for children and young people for the future.

You can come to either of the events and would welcome a full range of school staff, teachers and support staff. Your only qualifications are to be passionate about how we can change things for the better for our children and young people.

Workshop dates:

To register, click on the links below:

Date

Time

Venue

1 October 2015

4pm-6pm (registration from 3:45pm)

Gateshead Civic Centre

8 October 2015

4pm-6pm (registration from 3:45pm)

Great North Museum (previously the Hancock) Newcastle

 
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Older people
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In Gateshead, the Vanguard Care Home project, which is initially about improving care for people in care homes, is gathering pace.  We are currently waiting on feedback from the submission of our bid (a value proposition), which will  detailssthe resources needed to support the programme.

We are also reviewing our community services in Gateshead, with a new service being available towards the end of the year.

In Newcastle, we are looking at GP and nursing support to care homes, the introduction of a community geriatrician and are reviewing provision of intermediate care beds.


 
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Long term conditions
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In Gateshead, some of our current priorities include:

  • Creating an integrated diabetes service
  • Reviewing the provision of patient education for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes
  • Reviewing the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathway to increase the number of patients managed in primary care
  • Providing support to practices with higher levels of COPD emergency admissions
  • Developing cancer pathways to improve access to diagnostic tests

In Newcastle, some of our priorities are:

  • Reviewing our diabetes education and diabetes centre services
  • The successful roll-out of our Healthy Lung Programme
  • Revising the Heart Failure Service with Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals, to make improvements to the service for our patients
 
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Urgent care
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In collaboration with other CCGs in the North East and Cumbria, we have been successful in becoming a national urgent care vanguard site.  This means we get support to redesign the urgent care system across the region.


 
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Planned care
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Planned care is ‘elective’ work, such as planned procedures, operations and treatments. The focus this area of work is currently:

  • Providing care closer to home, particularly focusing on alternative ways of managing review appointments
  • Reviewing and transforming eye care
  • Creating a new service specification for musculoskeletal (MSK) services across the area

 
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New brain injury service launched for the people of Gateshead
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People who suffer brain injuries are benefiting from improved support, following the recent opening of a new service for patients in Gateshead. Jointly commissioned by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) across Gateshead and Sunderland and provided by Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, it offers specialist assessment, rehabilitation and community support for patients.


The change sees existing services in Gateshead expand to help patients with mild to moderate injuries as well as more severe cases, and extends services into Sunderland for the first time.

Dr Steve Kirk, Clinical Director at NHS Newcastle Gateshead Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “Brain injuries can affect people in many different ways, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. Our well established service for more complex and severe cases will continue, and will now be extended to help people with mild to moderate injuries to recover well, keep their jobs and maintain family roles.”

The two CCGs have invested an additional £1 million per year in the service, which was designed with help from local clinicians, service providers, voluntary organisations, patients and families. The service will offer assessment, advice and specialist rehabilitation, helping people with ongoing problems to regain their independence and functions as far as possible, as well as adapting to any long-term challenges from their injury.

The news has been welcomed by patients and their families, who helped to design the new service. Joanne Larner of Blaydon relied on the Gateshead brain injury service after her husband Mark, then 39, was severely injured in 2011. Mark, a building yard foreman, suffered from memory problems, depression and terrible headaches after coming home from hospital, and sadly passed away last year.

Joanne said: “The Acquired Brain Injury team are very close to my heart – without them, Mark would have had no quality of life at all. Our life changed dramatically overnight, but they helped him learn to walk, to write and even used lego to help him understand colours again.

“They really went above and beyond to help with things like benefits, books to help explain things to our son, and a limited return to work so that he could feel useful again.”

The effects of brain injury vary widely, depending on the type, location and severity of injury. Common symptoms include physical and sensory difficulties, problems with emotional control, communication, memory, and the ability to manage day to day tasks that were previously considered easy.

The team is working with local services and voluntary organisations to deliver a full range of rehabilitation services, including family and peer support. The aim is to provide specialist advice, support and rehabilitation for as many people as possible, as well as helping GPs to support patients effectively. The team is already accepting referrals from GPs, emergency departments, hospitals and the community.

 
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Stoptober is back!
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People can sign up to Stoptober and receive free support, including packs, apps and emails, to help them quit smoking for 28 days and beyond.

Research shows that smokers are two thirds (67%) more likely to quit when their spouse stops smoking, and a third more likely to quit when a close friend (36%) or someone they work with (34%) stops. The data also shows that individuals are much more likely (61%) to smoke if their partner or a close friend smokes - showing the powerful influence that people’s social networks have on their own smoking behaviour.

Also, from 1 October the law is changing, in England and Wales, to protect children from the dangers of second-hand smoke making it illegal to smoke in vehicles with someone under the age of 18 present. With one less place to smoke, there is one more reason to sign up to Stoptober.

For more information and to join the biggest stop smoking challenge of its kind, visit Stoptober.


 
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